Earnest Money Deposit Explained

An earnest money deposit is paid in the form of a check to the seller and is accompanied by the offer to purchase a piece of property. Its purpose is to demonstrate good faith that the buyer is willing to make an immediate investment, which is often referred to as, good faith. Often, the agent will deliver a copy of the check to the seller and hold onto the original until the seller agrees to the terms of the agreement offered. Then the check is released to escrow.

The earnest money deposit is often used as part of the down payment. For example: Let’s say that you are buying a house for $100,000 and you have an FHA loan. Your deposit will most likely be $1,000, which is 1% of the purchase price of the property and it will go toward your total FHA loan, which is 3.5%, or $3,500. So you can take the required $3,500 down payment and subtract the deposit you’ve already given when you submitted the offer and now only owe $2,500, which is the difference.

Whenever you meet up with a real estate agent, it’s always a wise idea to bring at least one check with you. Even though checks are starting to become an obsolete way of transferring funds, they are still widely used in real estate for proof of the initial deposit. If you do not have checks, you may be able to obtain some by contacting your bank in a short period of time. The sooner you do so, the better.

The earnest money deposit, for the most part, seems to hold a more symbolic gesture of good faith than the actual necessity of the payment. However, should you open up an escrow and then back out without a justifiable excuse, your earnest money deposit will be lost. Before you go into escrow on a house, or even put in an offer for that matter, be sure that you will be happy with that particular home before you open escrow and realize you may have made a mistake.

Your Bankruptcy Attorney – Guiding You Through the Process

If you are in deep financial trouble and are thinking about filing for bankruptcy, then you should hire a knowledgeable bankruptcy attorney that can guide you through the entire process.

Here is what your bankruptcy attorney will do once you have contacted them.

Your Attorney Will Ask For All the Relevant Papers

You will first need to go for mandatory credit counseling six months prior to filing for bankruptcy.

The proof of that counseling, along with other financial papers (such as a list of all your debts, expenses, income and assets), will have to be provided to your bankruptcy attorney before they can proceed.

They will study your documentation and then advise you on the best way out of your financial predicament.

Your Bankruptcy Attorney Will Then Decide On the Relevant Chapter

Based on your financial records, your bankruptcy attorney will come to a conclusion as to which chapter is more suitable for your situation.

If you have exhausted your sources of income, then you might be advised to file for bankruptcy under chapter 7. If you have a reduced source of income and would also like to save most of your assets, then your attorney might advise you to file under chapter 13.

If you own a business and you want to continue running it, then you could file for bankruptcy under chapter 11.

Your Attorney Can Help You with the ‘Means Test’

If you are filing for chapter 7 bankruptcy, then your bankruptcy attorney can help you calculate your gross and net income for the previous six months. That income will be compared to the average median income of a similar-sized family in your town.

If you do qualify to file under Chapter 7 bankruptcy, then your attorney will coordinate with a trustee appointed by the bankruptcy court in disposing your assets in order to pay off your creditors.

If your income exceeds “means test” guidelines for qualifying filing a Chapter 7, then your attorney will now have to shift their attention to filing for bankruptcy under chapter 13, which requires a new repayment schedule.

This schedule will help you clear your old debts over a period of 3 to 5 years.

Your Bankruptcy Attorney Can Draw Up a New Schedule for the Court

If you need to file for bankruptcy under chapter 13, then your attorney can draw up a new repayment schedule and get it approved by the court after arranging a meeting with your creditors.

Once the repayment plan is approved, then you will need to start your payments according to that schedule.

Your Attorney Can Help You Avoid the Pitfalls

Filing for bankruptcy can be a complicated affair – and you will probably be too worried to be thinking straight.

An efficient bankruptcy attorney can calm you down and point out the pitfalls and advantages of filing for bankruptcy under different chapters after analyzing your case.

Hiring an attorney can save you a lot of time and effort. They will do the legwork involved to close your case at the earliest possible time.

An experienced, knowledgeable bankruptcy attorney is a vital asset to have on your side when you are facing financial difficulties and thinking of filing for bankruptcy.

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